Safe Sex

When we talk about safe sex, we’re really talking about safer sex – because all sex comes with some risk. No type of sex with a partner can be guaranteed to be 100% safe, but you can greatly reduce your risk by practicing protection and prevention.

Tap one of the icons below to learn more about different forms of protection.

Condoms

Condoms are still the most effective way to prevent STDs. Condoms come in all different sizes, shpaes, and flavors. We recommend trying different brands and sizes just like you would with ice cream, or coffee. You may not like them all, but you'll find a  few that you do!

Internal Condoms

Internal condoms are designed as an alternative to regular condoms. They remain inside of the vagina or rectum instead of around the penis. Because they are made of nitrile, those with latex allergies can use them comfortably.

PrEP

PrEP is an anti-HIV medication, short for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Taken daily, it can reduce HIV risk by up to 99%. Studies show that PrEP is highly effective when taken daily, but is much less effective when not taken consistently.

Regular Testing

Getting regularly tested for STDs is one of the most effective tools at stopping the spread of these diseases in their tracks. Sexually active individuals take part in stopping these diseases by getting tested and preventing them from spreading further.

Questions

Safe sex is sexual contact that doesn’t result in exchanging bodily fluids between partners. Sexual contact that carries a low risk of STD transmission includes:

  • kissing
  • cuddling
  • massages
  • masturbation
  • mutual masturbation
  • sexual intercourse using barrier contraception

Condoms are the best available protection against STIs. For vaginal, anal, and oral sex, you should use condoms.

PrEP is for people without HIV who are at a higher risk of being exposed to the virus, which can include men who have sex with men, injection drug users, and sex workers. To learn if PrEP is right for you, visit our information page or contact our PrEP Coordinator at 804.205.3508.

Regular testing is advised to be done every 3-to-6 months for sexually active individuals. Everyone at some point in their life should get screened for HIV at least once. Find free testing opportunities near you from our partners.

Richmond City Health District distributes condoms for free at any of their resource centers, or at their main site at 400 E. Cary Street. No need to call ahead – just stop by and ask the front desk any day that we’re open! A variety of condoms are offered, so ask if you would like any lube, latex-free condoms or internal condoms.

Vaccines are a safe and effective way to prevent the spread of Hepatitis B and HPV. HPV vaccines are recommended for all teen girls ad women through age 26 and all teen boys and men through age 21. You should also get a Hepatitis B vaccine if you were not vaccinated at a younger age.

Men who have sex with men should also get Hepatitis A vaccinations, which can be spread via sexual activity.

Richmond City Health District offers an immunization clinic on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Hepatitis A vaccines are currently free to those who are at risk of getting the disease. For more information, call 804.482.5500.

Feel free to get into contact with us by filling out this form, or give us a call at 804.381.2616.

Conversation

Often times, one of the most underestimated tools an individual has to practice safe sex is their ability to talk to a partner. Communication is already a huge part of any relationship, sexual or not. Extending communication to talk about things like STD testing and prevention measures with your partner leads to greater happiness and wellbeing in your sexual life. 

  • Use statements that focus on yourself. Say “I would like to wear a condom to protect us,” instead of “you should really get on birth control.
  • Clearly state your expectations for sex, and what you are and are not comfortable doing.
  • Use reinforcing and positive language to get across the point that you care about your partner’s health.
  • Make sure that you are listening. Conversation is a two-way street, and you should attempt to understand your partner’s point of view, and ask each other questions.

  • Use statements that focus on yourself. Say “I would like to wear a condom to protect us,” instead of “you should really get on birth control.
  • Clearly state your expectations for sex, and what you are and are not comfortable doing.
  • Use reinforcing and positive language to get across the point that you care about your partner’s health.
  • Make sure that you are listening. Conversation is a two-way street, and you should attempt to understand your partner’s point of view, and ask each other questions.

Richmond Sex Ed Project

Richmond Sex Ed Project Group Photo

The Richmond Sex Ed Project is an organization based in Richmond that helps to foster consensual relationships through interactive consent workshops and sex ed. Their approach focuses on the development of empathetic communication skills, personal boundary awareness, and using community building to strengthen individuals capabilities to increase consensual interactions and reduce harm within relationships. To learn more about their workshops, community events, and collaboration nights, visit their website.

Safe Sex

When we talk about safe sex, we’re really talking about safer sex – because all sex comes with some risk. No type of sex with a partner can be guaranteed to be 100% safe, but you can greatly reduce your risk by practicing protection and prevention.

Condoms

Condoms

Still the most effective way to prevent STDs. Condoms come in all different sizes, shapes, and flavors. We recommend trying different brands and sizes just like you would with ice cream, or coffee. You may not like them all, but you'll find a few that you do!

PrEP

PrEP

PrEP is an anti-HIV medication, short for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Taken daily, it can reduce HIV risk by up to 99%. Studies show that PrEP is highly effective when taken daily, but is much less effective when not taken consistently.

Get Tested

Regular Testing

Getting regularly tested for STDs is one of the most effective tools at stopping the spread of these diseases in their tracks. Sexually active individuals take part in stopping these diseases by getting tested and preventing them from spreading further.

Questions

Safe sex is sexual contact that doesn’t result in exchanging bodily fluids between partners. Sexual contact that carries a low risk of STD transmission includes:

  • kissing
  • cuddling
  • massages
  • masturbation
  • mutual masturbation
  • sexual intercourse using barrier contraception

Condoms are the best available protection against STIs. For vaginal, anal, and oral sex, you should use condoms.

PrEP is for people without HIV who are at a higher risk of being exposed to the virus, which can include men who have sex with men, injection drug users, and sex workers. To learn if PrEP is right for you, visit our information page or contact our PrEP Coordinator at 804.205.3508.

Regular testing is advised to be done every 3-to-6 months for sexually active individuals. Everyone at some point in their life should get screened for HIV at least once. Find free testing opportunities near you from our partners.

Richmond City Health District distributes condoms for free at any of their resource centers, or at their main site at 400 E. Cary Street. No need to call ahead – just stop by and ask the front desk any day that we’re open! A variety of condoms are offered, so ask if you would like any lube, latex-free condoms or internal condoms.

Vaccines are a safe and effective way to prevent the spread of Hepatitis B and HPV. HPV vaccines are recommended for all teen girls ad women through age 26 and all teen boys and men through age 21. You should also get a Hepatitis B vaccine if you were not vaccinated at a younger age.

Men who have sex with men should also get Hepatitis A vaccinations, which can be spread via sexual activity.

Richmond City Health District offers an immunization clinic on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Hepatitis A vaccines are currently free to those who are at risk of getting the disease. For more information, call 804.482.5500.

Feel free to get into contact with us by filling out this form, or give us a call at 804.381.2616.

Internal Condom

Internal Condoms

Internal condoms are designed to be an alternative to regular condoms that remain inside of the vagina or rectum instead of around the penis. They are made of soft plastic called nitrile, so individuals who have latex allergies can use them comfortably. You may find them more comfortable because they don't fit snugly against the penis. Having your partner put an internal condom in for you turns safe sex into intimate foreplay. For more information, unmute the video below:

Conversation

Often times, one of the most underestimated tools an individual has to practice safe sex is their ability to talk to a partner. Communication is already a huge part of any relationship, sexual or not. Extending communication to talk about things like STD testing and prevention measures with your partner leads to greater happiness and wellbeing in your sexual life. 

DO

  • Use statements that focus on yourself. Say “I would like to wear a condom to protect us,” instead of “you should really get on birth control.
  • Clearly state your expectations for sex, and what you are and are not comfortable doing.
  • Use reinforcing and positive language to get across the point that you care about your partner’s health.
  • Make sure that you are listening. Conversation is a two-way street, and you should attempt to understand your partner’s point of view, and ask each other questions.

DON’T

  • Try to control your partners opinions and thoughts. Coming off as confrontational or judgemental can cause the conversation to cease, and can come across to your partner as writing them off.
  • Start the conversation right when you’re about to have sex. Talk about it before that moment happens so that you can be ready when it does.
  • Force it. Find the right time and place to have a conversation that is natural for you and your partner.
  • Do anything you’re not comfortable with. Clearly state your expectations for sex, and understand your partner’s as well.

The Richmond Sex Ed Project is a Richmond-based organization that fosters consensual relationships through interactive consent workshops and sex education. Their approach focuses on the development of empathetic communication skills, personal boundary awareness, and community building to strengthen individuals capabilities to increase consensual interactions and reduce harm within relationships. To learn more about the workshops, community events, and collaboration nights, visit their website.