Syphilis

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0
new cases in 2017

Syphilis is at its highest rate in more than 20 years, with rates rising in both men and women, in all racial and ethnic groups.

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Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men accounted for roughly 58% of all new primary and secondary syphilis cases.

Diamonds Border
Diamonds Border
0
new cases in 2017

Syphilis is at its highest rate in more than 20 years, with rates rising in both men and women, in all racial and ethnic groups.

0%

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men accounted for roughly 58% of all new primary and secondary syphilis cases.

What is syphilis?

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that can cause serious health problems if it’s not treated. This STD works by causing sores – called chancres – at the site of infection, that can easily spread the infection to other people. Syphilis is spread by direct contact with one of these sores during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chancres can be found on or around the penis, vagina, anus, in the rectum, on the lips, or in the mouth.

Syphilis can be cured with the right antibiotics; however, treatment might not undo any damage that the infection does to your body. That’s why it’s important to test for STDs if you are sexually active – the quicker you know if you have any STD, the quicker it can be treated. Using condoms for vaginal and anal sex, as well as dental dams for oral sex, offer you the best protection against STDs

Would I know if I have it?

Are there symptoms?

Syphilis is sneaky, because you might not have any symptoms that you see or feel. Sometimes, signs can be mild, so you may not notice them or you may confuse them with other things, like pimples or rashes. Symptoms may also come and go over time, but the infection can not go away on its own. The only way to know if you have syphilis is to test for it. The only way to get rid of it is to take the right medication for it.

There are four stages, each with different signs and symptoms – the primary stage, the secondary stage, the latent stage, and the tertiary stage.

The appearance of single or multiple chancres (sores) mark the first stage of syphilis. These chancres are firm, round, and usually painless, but that is not always the case. These sores appear at the location where syphilis entered the body, which can sometimes make them difficult to notice. Chancres can last 3-to-6 weeks whether a person receives treatment or not; however, if treatment is not received, the infection will progress to the secondary stage.

Skin rashes or sores in the mouth, vagina, or anus mark the second stage of symptoms. Rashes can develop on one or more areas of the body, and appear several weeks after a chancre is gone; however, rashes can be so faint that they go unnoticed. Other symptoms can include fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, and fatigue. These symptoms will go away with or without treatment, but without treatment, the infection will progress to the latent and possibly tertiary stage of the disease.

This stage is a period of time when there are no visible signs or symptoms of syphilis. A person with an infection will continue to have the disease in their body even if signs or symptoms are not present. Latent syphilis can last for years.

It is rare for syphilis to reach this stage. The tertiary stage can appear 10-30 years  after infection was first acquired, and can be fatal. This stage can affect multiple organs, including the brain, nerves, eyes, heart, blood vessels, liver, bones, and joints.

Quick Facts

  • The United States has seen a 76% increase in syphilis cases since 2013.
  • Syphilis has four distinct stages: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary syphilis. There may not have symptoms in certain stages, so it’s important to get tested regularly. Otherwise, it can cause serious medical concerns later on in life.
  • Men who have sex with men made up over 52% of new syphilis cases in 2017, which means men who have sex with men are at greater risk of infection than other populations. 

Since 2013, the United States has seen a

0%

increase in new syphilis cases.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a serious STD that can have major health consequences if not properly treated. Tap one of the buttons or scroll down for more info.

What is it?

Quick Facts

Symptoms

0
new cases in 2017

Syphilis is at its highest rate in more than 20 years, with rates rising in both men and women, in all racial and ethnic groups.

0 %

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men accounted for roughly 58% of all new primary and secondary syphilis cases.

What is it?

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that can cause serious health problems if it’s not treated. This STD works by causing sores – called chancres – at the site of infection, that can easily spread the infection to other people. Syphilis is spread by direct contact with one of these sores during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chancres can be found on or around the penis, vagina, anus, in the rectum, on the lips, or in the mouth. Read More

Since 2013, the United States has seen a

0 %

increase in new syphilis cases.

Quick Facts

  • The United States has seen a 76% increase in syphilis cases since 2013.
  • Syphilis has four distinct stages: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary syphilis. There may not have symptoms in certain stages, so it’s important to get tested regularly. Otherwise, it can cause serious medical concerns later on in life.
  • Men who have sex with men made up over 52% of new syphilis cases in 2017, which means men who have sex with men are at greater risk of infection than other populations. 

Get tested for syphilis for free!

Would I know if I have it?

Syphilis is sneaky, because you or your partner may not have any symptoms that you see or feel. Sometimes, signs can be mild, so you may not notice them or you may confuse them with other things, like pimples or rashes. Symptoms can come and go over time, but the infection can not go away on its own. The only way to know if you have syphilis is to test for it. The only way to get rid of it is to take the right medication.

There are four stages, each with different signs and symptoms – the primary stage, the secondary stage, the latent stage, and the tertiary stage.

The appearance of single or multiple chancres (sores) mark the first stage of syphilis. These chancres are firm, round, and usually painless, but that is not always the case. These sores appear at the location where syphilis entered the body, which can sometimes make them difficult to notice. Chancres can last 3-to-6 weeks whether a person receives treatment or not; however, if treatment is not received, the infection will progress to the secondary stage.

Skin rashes or sores in the mouth, vagina, or anus mark the second stage of symptoms. Rashes can develop on one or more areas of the body, and appear several weeks after a chancre is gone; however, rashes can be so faint that they go unnoticed. Other symptoms can include fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, and fatigue. These symptoms will go away with or without treatment, but without treatment, the infection will progress to the latent and possibly tertiary stage of the disease.

This stage is a period of time when there are no visible signs or symptoms of syphilis. A person with an infection will continue to have the disease in their body even if signs or symptoms are not present. Latent syphilis can last for years.

It is rare for syphilis to reach this stage. The tertiary stage can appear 10-30 years  after infection was first acquired, and can be fatal. This stage can affect multiple organs, including the brain, nerves, eyes, heart, blood vessels, liver, bones, and joints.